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Long term socio-economic impact of near miss obstetric complications on women and their households: a longitudinal study in Burkina Faso

G Patrick Christian Ilboudo, Agence de Formation, de Recherche et d'Expertise en Santé pour l'Afrique (AFRICSanté)
Steve Russell, University of East Anglia
Ben D'Exelle, University of East Anglia

INTRODUCTION: Few studies have reported on the long term socio-economic impact of nearmiss obstetric complications on women and their households. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the long term socio-economic impact of nearmiss obstetric complications on women and their households in Burkina Faso METHODS: We created an epidemiological cohort of 1014 nearmiss and uncomplicated delivery women. More than four/five years later, we compared household and individual level economic and well-being indicators of nearmiss women with uncomplicated delivery women. RESULTS: We found that households of women women were significantly different on some key economic outcomes compared to households of women who had an uncomplicated delivery. They were significantly more likely to face food insecurity compared to uncomplicated women. At the individual level, nearmiss women were significantly different from uncomplicated delivery. CONCLUSION: We conclude that severe obstetric complications pose long lasting negative effects on the livelihoods of women and their households.

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Presented in Session 106: Impacts of health on socioeconomic development